Day: May 6, 2021

respond to light even after decapitation many thanks to an eye-independent light-sensing system that works with movement. Their searchings for were published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

In an eye-opening discovery, researchers from India have found that flatworms can respond to light even after decapitation many thanks to an eye-independent light-sensing system that coordinates motion. From tiny jellyfish-like hydra to nematodes that live in near-complete darkness, various organisms have developed their own special ways to detect light even without the feeling of sight.Now, a team led

by Aide Teacher Akash Gulyani from the University of Hyderabad, has shown that is possible for both eye-dependent as well as independent light-sensing systems to coexist in a single, tiny organism: the flatworm.Named for their heavily flattened bodies, flatworms normally possess two delicate eyes connected to a primitive brain. Cells within this eye-independent system shared light-sensitive healthy proteins called opsins, describing the worm’s capacity to react to light even in the absence of vision.While the flatworms’eyes can detect a wide wavelength of visible light( ~ 365 to 625 nm), the eye-independent system just reacts to a limited range of uaviolet light at 365 to 395 nm. Low dosages of uaviolet light can stir up resting flatworms through the abovementioned system.Interestingly, though the worm develops its conventional set of eyes as an embryo, the eye-independent system only occurs in their adult counterparts. According to the authors, this recommends that details transformative pressures like a low-light environment may activate flatworms to establish the eye-independent light-sensing system.